So Much Mozart!


I wrote about a slew of Mozart pieces for three all-Mozart concerts performed by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, starting with opening weekend (this weekend, in fact!). There’s still plenty of time to get tickets to all the upcoming performances, which feature pianist Emanuel Ax.

On Mozart’s Symphony No. 41 (“Jupiter”), the overture to Le Nozze di Figaro, and Piano Concertos Nos. 19 and 27. (My notes begin on p. 24.)

On Mozart’s Symphony No. 39, the overture to Così fan tutte, and Piano Concertos Nos. 20 and 14. (My notes begin on p . 24.)

On Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, Piano Concertos No. 16 and 17, and the overture to Don Giovanni (My notes begin on p. 32.)


Lutoslawski, Mozart, and Brahms


I wrote about Witold Lutoslawski (pictured at his piano), specifically his Concerto for Orchestra, as well as Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27, Mozart’s final work in that form, and Brahms’s Fourth (and final) Symphony. A slightly altered version of these program notes accompanied a recent Dallas Symphony concert.



Two Wolfgangs


“The Requiem is beautiful, like everything Mozart made, but it’s also profoundly scary. It sucks your measly soul into its wild dark maw and swallows it whole.”

Later today (Sunday, November 20), I’m going to see the St. Louis Symphony and Chorus perform Mozart’s Requiem, about which I am very excited. My friend Patty is singing, which is always a pleasure, and I’m going with my longtime pal Cat Pick, also always a pleasure. I didn’t write the program notes for this concert, but as it happens, I did write about Mozart’s Requiem for the Dallas Symphony a couple of seasons ago. Here’s an oldie-but-hopefully-goodie: Wolfgang Rihm’s Trio Concerto and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Requiem. These notes were originally published in a somewhat different form, in the spring of 2015, but I hold the copyright, so here they are in their original incarnation.


Brahms Reimagined


Arnold Schoenberg, self-portrait

“Mysteries conceal a truth, but direct curiosity to unveil it.”—Arnold Schoenberg, “Brahms the Progressive”

I wrote about the “Brahms Reimagined” program for the St. Louis Symphony concerts of October 28 and 29, with special guest pianist Jeremy Denk, who performs Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23. Also on the program are Liszt’s Prometheus and Schoenberg’s orchestration of Brahms’s Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 25.



All-Mozart, SLSO


I wrote about an All-Mozart program for the St. Louis Symphony concerts of October 7 and 8, with special guest violinist Jennifer Koh, who performs Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 1. Also on the program: Symphony No. 31 (“Paris”) and Serenade No. 9 (“Posthorn). My notes begin on p. 26. (Please excuse the typo in the penultimate line on p. 29; I would fix it if I could.)

Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3


Beethoven bust in Tower Grove Park. Photographed by me.

I wrote about Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 (along with Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte overture and Benjamin’s Viola, Viola) for the St. Louis Symphony concerts of September 24 and 25, with special guest Yefim Bronfman. (My notes begin on p. 31.)

I had far more material than I was able to publish, given the word constraints, so I’m also including some supplementary content in the form of a PDF, which I hope turns out OK. If it does, I will probably start posting my notes for Dallas Symphony, which aren’t archived on the symphony website for some reason.