Britten, Saint-Saëns, Vaughan Williams


This weekend (March 10 and 11), guest conductor Cristian Macelaru leads the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra in works by Britten, Saint-Saëns, and Vaughan Williams. Special guest soloist James Ehnes performs Saint-Saëns’s Third (and final) Violin Concerto.

My program notes begin on p. 26 and can be read here:

Tune in at 8 PM CST to St. Louis Public Radio on Saturday, March 10. That’s FM 90.7 for those of you in the broadcast range, or you can click on the livestream here:


Borodin and Tchaikovsky


On December 2 through December 4, the Saint Louis Symphony performs works by Alexsandr Borodin and Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky (pictured). Ward Stare conducts, with solo performances by David Halen, concertmaster, and Allegra Lilly, principal harp.

I wrote program notes for this concert, which appear in a slightly altered form in the printed program and on the STL Symphony website.



All-Mozart, SLSO


I wrote about an All-Mozart program for the St. Louis Symphony concerts of October 7 and 8, with special guest violinist Jennifer Koh, who performs Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 1. Also on the program: Symphony No. 31 (“Paris”) and Serenade No. 9 (“Posthorn). My notes begin on p. 26. (Please excuse the typo in the penultimate line on p. 29; I would fix it if I could.)

Romantic Projections


The St. Louis Symphony performs Elgar’s Introduction and Allegro, Glanert’s Frenesia (in its U.S. premiere!), and Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2 (with pianist Emanuel Ax) on Saturday, April 25, and Sunday, April 26, 2015. My program notes start on p. 26.

First SLSO Youth Orchestra concert of the season: 11/24/13

My program notes for the first SLSO Youth Orchestra concert of the season, on Buxtehude/Chávez, Pärt, Britten, and Dvorák. The Youth Orchestra concerts are free (well, except for a $1 service charge for tickets). You should go.

Get tickets for the concert here:

And yes, I realize that I am missing an important diacritical mark above, in a certain Czech composer’s name. I really ought to learn how to make that weird mark over the “r,” and I really ought to learn the name for it and stop calling it weird.